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March 5, 2013
Tuesday Truths
March-at-Last Edition

by John Gasaway

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Welcome to Tuesday Truths, where I look at how well 131 teams in the nation's top 11 conferences are doing against their league opponents on a per-possession basis. For a tidy little homily on why this stuff is so very awesome, go here.

ACC: Reggie Bullock for National POY

Through games of March 4, conference games only
Pace: possessions per 40 minutes
PPP: points per possession Opp. PPP: opponent PPP
EM: efficiency margin (PPP - Opp. PPP)

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Miami            14-2   64.6    1.07    0.92    +0.15
2.  Duke             12-4   68.6    1.13    1.00    +0.13
3.  Virginia         10-6   60.9    1.06    0.94    +0.12
4.  North Carolina   11-5   69.2    1.05    0.97    +0.08
5.  NC State         10-6   68.6    1.09    1.03    +0.06
6.  Maryland          8-8   67.9    0.98    0.97    +0.01
7.  Georgia Tech     5-11   67.4    0.91    0.98    -0.07
8.  Boston College   5-11   63.4    1.03    1.10    -0.07
9.  Clemson          5-11   62.2    0.93    1.01    -0.08
10. Wake Forest      5-11   68.6    0.94    1.02    -0.08
11. Florida St.       7-9   63.9    0.97    1.08    -0.11
12. Virginia Tech    4-12   64.5    0.99    1.12    -0.13

AVG.                        65.8    1.01

I'm late to this whole "North Carolina has turned their season around" party, but I want to get my two cents in before what promises to be an outstanding game this weekend in Chapel Hill against Duke (not to mention an intriguing road test tomorrow night at Maryland). So: North Carolina has turned their season around. P.J. Hairston was inserted into the starting lineup in mid-February and, not counting games where the Tar Heels were playing in Cameron Indoor Stadium, that new-look configuration has reeled off five straight wins.

Let's get the buzzkill part out of the way. Part of this has been luck. In their "old" look North Carolina watched fretfully as their ACC opponents made threes at a rate (38 percent) that probably wasn't going to continue. Sure enough, opponents have cooled off from outside. Meanwhile over their last five wins, UNC has made threes at a rate (42 percent) that probably won't continue.

That being said, the lion's share of the Heels' resurgence has been earned, and you can start with the microscopic turnover rate. In those five wins UNC has given the ball away on just 13 percent of their possessions. Carolina is just burying opponents with the sheer volume of effective possessions they get, and the guy with the biggest shovel is arguably Reggie Bullock. A dual-threat wing who's more or less equally likely to shoot from either side of the line, Bullock has posted the following numbers over the last five games: 44 percent on threes, 77 percent on twos. That's pretty good.

BONUS "Who are those guys?" note! Let's see, UNC's now taking care of the ball like Bo Ryan on his most meticulous and cautious day. These guys never get to the line anymore. And they've even started saying no thanks to offensive boards. Someone launch an investigation. I'm pretty sure this "Roy Williams," whoever he is, was replaced by an impostor at some point.

Big 12: My stab at a Baylor pre-mortem

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Kansas           14-3   66.5    1.07    0.90    +0.17
2.  Oklahoma St.     12-4   68.1    1.04    0.92    +0.12
3.  Kansas St.       13-3   62.5    1.11    1.00    +0.11
4.  Oklahoma         10-6   67.2    1.08    1.01    +0.07
5.  Iowa St.          9-7   67.3    1.12    1.06    +0.06
6.  Baylor            8-9   66.9    1.03    0.98    +0.05
7.  West Virginia    6-10   63.6    0.98    1.03    -0.05
8.  Texas            6-11   65.4    0.99    1.05    -0.06
9.  Texas Tech       3-14   65.3    0.88    1.12    -0.24
10. TCU              1-15   62.1    0.83    1.08    -0.25

AVG.                        65.5    1.01

There is always room in our popular hoops imagination for the coach who's a great recruiter but just can't deliver the results on the court, and for years Scott Drew's been battling Rick Barnes to be the consensus No. 1 choice in this role. I actually disagree with that popular imagination, at least to a degree. Barnes is clearly a better coach than he's been given credit for, and as for Drew, well, I guess I wouldn't mind too terribly much if my coach blew two-for-one opportunities just as long as my team had been to two of the last three Elite Eights.

At the moment one can hear much clucking of tongues over the fact that a team blessed with the conference preseason player of the year (Pierre Jackson) and a one-and-done lottery-pick-to-be (Isaiah Austin) is in danger of getting shipped off to the NIT. After all, in the preseason the league's coaches picked the Bears to finish second to Kansas. Similarly, the polls and laptops also agreed on Baylor in the preseason. Pretty much everyone or everything involved expected Drew's men to be the second-best team in the league and something between about No. 18 and 25 nationally.

We know now everyone -- coaches, writers, laptops, and perhaps Drew himself -- was wrong, but I'm not sure the entirety of this can be laid at the coach's feet. The largest single difference year-to-year in this team is that they're not making as many shots as they did last season. Certainly a coach has to put his players "in position" to score, but it's a safe bet Drew's putting Jackson and Austin in pretty much the same scoring positions that Jackson, Perry Jones, and Quincy Miller were in last year.

The Bears have also suffered from a severe and dispositive deficit in the "clutch" or "they just want it more" department. Suffice it to say it's unusual for a team outscoring opponents by 0.05 points per trip to lose more times than they win. I suppose you could say Drew brings that upon himself with late-game missteps, but presumably he was blowing two-for-ones last season as well. This all feels a little more idiosyncratic and a little less systemic to me than we're being led to believe.

Louisville vs. the (recent Big East) greats

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Louisville       13-4   64.2    1.05    0.88    +0.17
2.  Pitt             11-6   61.3    1.05    0.93    +0.12
3.  Georgetown       13-3   61.7    1.03    0.92    +0.11
4.  Syracuse         10-6   62.1    1.06    0.97    +0.09
5.  Marquette        12-4   62.2    1.08    0.99    +0.09
6.  Villanova         9-8   65.8    0.99    0.95    +0.04
7.  Connecticut       9-7   64.9    1.04    1.01    +0.03
8.  Notre Dame       10-6   59.8    1.07    1.05    +0.02
9.  Cincinnati        8-9   61.5    0.96    0.97    -0.01
10. Providence        8-8   66.1    1.00    1.03    -0.03
11. St. John's        8-8   67.3    0.94    0.97    -0.03
12. Rutgers          4-12   62.7    0.96    1.07    -0.11
13. Seton Hall       3-13   63.7    0.94    1.08    -0.14
14. DePaul           2-14   70.4    0.98    1.13    -0.15
15. S. Florida       2-14   60.0    0.89    1.08    -0.19

AVG.                        63.6    1.00

Rick Pitino's men are commonly regarded as the Big East's second-best team, for the eminently sensible reason that they possess the league's second-best record. If the Cardinals wanted recognition for being preeminent, they probably should have guarded Garrick Sherman in any one of several overtimes in South Bend a while back.

Fair enough. But in terms of Final Four potential, the numbers shown here suggest Louisville may actually be one of the best teams the Big East has produced in years. Likely as good as last year's 17-1 Syracuse team, for example. Pitt in 2011 was also pretty fair, though their legacy is forever dimmed by their encounter with Butler in that year's round of 32. And once you go back to (yes) The Year of All Big East Years, 2009, you can find multiple teams -- including Louisville itself, of course -- that could absolutely look this group of Cardinals in the eye. (Just to touch a few bases here: Louisville was the overall NCAA tournament 1 seed in 2009, UConn and Pitt also earned 1 seeds, and the conference put four teams -- all of the above, plus Villanova -- into the Elite Eight. Big Ten 2013, I hope you're taking notes.)

So, yes, the best information we have suggests that Louisville is really good, yet they're not being recognized as such. Instead this team is regarded as the latest in a long line of Cardinal rosters that are excellent on D and so-so on offense. Actually the 'Ville is excellent on D and pretty good on offense.

Part of the problem here is purely visual, or what, if we were all here to discuss the sequester and dreary stuff like that, one might call optics. In terms of optics, free throws are the dullest things around, but Russ Smith is currently locked in some kind of amazing Tyler-Hansbrough-in-2009-like trance. Smith is pretty reliably getting to the line 10 times a game, and over the past seven contests he's knocking those freebies down at an 87 percent clip. That is highly effective. So is holding on to the ball, which Louisville did not do nearly as well last season. None of the above rules out a Pitt-in-2011-level mishap, of course, but now you know just how surprised you should be if that does come to pass.

Big Ten: Scheduling is important -- ask Fran McCaffery

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Indiana          13-3   66.0    1.15    0.97    +0.18
2.  Michigan         11-5   62.8    1.12    1.01    +0.11
3.  Wisconsin        11-5   59.5    1.01    0.90    +0.11
4.  Michigan St.     11-5   64.3    1.06    0.98    +0.08
5.  Ohio St.         11-5   62.2    1.03    0.96    +0.07
6.  Minnesota         8-8   61.6    1.04    1.02    +0.02
7.  Iowa              7-9   65.3    0.99    0.98    +0.01
8.  Illinois          8-8   63.9    1.02    1.02     0.00
9.  Purdue            7-9   64.0    0.95    1.03    -0.08
10. Nebraska         4-12   62.0    0.91    1.06    -0.15
11. Penn St.         1-15   64.7    0.90    1.08    -0.18
12. Northwestern     4-12   59.6    0.93    1.11    -0.18

AVG.                        63.0    1.01

Over the course of 1,070 Big Ten possessions thus far, Iowa has been the functional equivalent of Illinois. That's a very large slice of basketball, so we can state with some degree of confidence that the Hawkeyes and the Illini are more or less similar in terms of how well they play this sport. Yet it is John Groce's team that's being projected as a No. 8 seed, while Fran McCaffery's squad sits behind perhaps as many as six or seven other teams in the race for the final at-large bid. This state of affairs marks something of a departure from what's customary. Since the dawn of hoops time, a .500-y team from the No. 1 league in the country has always been worthy of serious consideration as a No. 10 seed or thereabouts. Not this time.

I'm not lobbying on the Hawkeyes' behalf (losing by 16 at Virginia Tech in November didn't exactly help matters), merely remarking on a jewel of an illustration. McCaffery knows exactly how this game works, and his team played the non-conference schedule that he put together. And, just as surely as day follows night, the RPI has missed badly (it's off by about 50 spots) on its evaluation of Iowa.

Yes, yes, it's terrible that the RPI exists in 2013, terrible that it whiffed so badly on your team, etc., etc. But surely we are long past the point where we should be surprised by the RPI's well-documented Travis Bickle-level obsession with schedule strength. If you tee up a profile like this and let the RPI take a swing at you, the RPI will snap-hook you into the rough every single time. The RPI is just flummoxed by you, and you have to know that going in. Schedule accordingly.

How a preternaturally weird Pac-12 has helped Arizona

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Arizona          11-6   67.1    1.05    0.99    +0.06
2.  Oregon           12-4   68.0    1.00    0.95    +0.05
3.  UCLA             12-4   70.1    1.01    0.96    +0.05
4.  Stanford          8-9   68.1    1.04    0.99    +0.05
5.  Cal              12-5   65.1    0.99    0.95    +0.04
6.  Colorado          9-7   63.7    0.99    0.97    +0.02
7.  Arizona St.       9-8   64.1    1.02    1.01    +0.01
8.  Washington        8-8   66.2    0.99    1.00    -0.01
9.  USC               9-7   68.8    0.99    1.01    -0.02
10. Oregon St.       3-13   67.8    1.01    1.07    -0.06
11. Washington St.   2-14   63.2    1.01    1.10    -0.09
12. Utah             3-13   63.1    0.93    1.06    -0.13

AVG.                        66.3    1.00

I've been thinking about the role that atmospheric effects play in college hoops. Take Arizona. A little like Illinois, the Wildcats are off the charts in the "good win" category, with a 19-point neutral-floor victory over Miami and a nail-biter at home over Florida to their credit. Presumably that's what has Sean Miller's team still being projected as a top-16 seed on the S-curve, even though by Tuesday Truths' lights UA is rather unprepossessing. NC State, to take one teachably innocuous example, is outscoring a slightly stronger league by an identical margin, and no one's in a rush to put Mark Gottfried's team on the 4-line.

In addition to those good wins, I think Arizona has benefited from atmospheric effects, specifically the absence this season of a standard-issue very good Pac-12 team. There is no such team in 2013, one about as strong as, say, Washington was in 2011. A nation of hoops observers has registered correctly that the Pac-12 is far better top-to-bottom than it was last season, and as a result there's room in our hearts, around No. 15 or so in the polls, and somewhere in the vicinity of the 4-line in the brackets for the best team from such a league.

But the cardinal quality of this year's Pac-12 is that no team has been able to distinguish itself performance-wise. The league's about to set a Tuesday Truths record for smallest per-possession scoring margin by a conference's No. 1 team. Our expectations are such that in any given year the top team from a conference is probably very good relative to the rest of the league. This season the Pac-12 is standing that expectation on its head, and Arizona is the clear beneficiary.

Instead of "bubble" this season just say "SEC"

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Florida          13-3   63.0    1.15    0.86    +0.29
2.  Missouri         10-6   67.9    1.11    1.01    +0.10
3.  Ole Miss         10-6   69.3    1.07    1.00    +0.07
4.  Kentucky         11-5   65.8    1.06    1.01    +0.05
5.  Alabama          11-5   61.6    0.97    0.92    +0.05
6.  Tennessee         9-7   63.1    1.04    1.02    +0.02
7.  Arkansas          9-7   68.5    0.96    0.95    +0.01
8.  Vanderbilt        7-9   61.4    0.98    0.97    +0.01
9.  Texas A&M         7-9   60.8    1.00    1.00     0.00
10. LSU               8-8   66.8    0.98    1.01    -0.03
11. Georgia           8-8   61.7    0.96    1.00    -0.04
12. South Carolina   3-13   64.7    0.90    1.04    -0.14
13. Auburn           3-13   65.2    0.92    1.07    -0.15
14. Mississippi St.  3-13   67.4    0.84    1.09    -0.25

AVG.                        64.8    1.00

Florida and Missouri will be in the NCAA tournament, and past that, to quote William Goldman, nobody knows anything. I'm writing this on March 5, and even at this late date both of the following statements are still within the bounds of possibility:

The SEC will get just two bids.

The SEC will get six bids.

No, I wouldn't bet the house on that second one, either. But you have to admit the prevalence of SEC teams on all those "First Four Out" lists floating around is pretty striking. Let's take a quick look at each of the candidates, shall we?

Kentucky is hanging on for dear tournament life, currently projected as a No. 12 seed and, of all things, facing a suddenly critical road game at Georgia on Thursday. In their post-Noel configuration the Wildcats have actually been scoring just fine, but they can't stop anyone not named "Mississippi State." Make an effort to watch this team over its next two games (at UGA and at home against Florida), because history is fairly insistent on this point. You will never see a John Calipari team play defense this poorly again.

Tennessee is the clearly feel-good story from this group. The Volunteers were left for dead when Cuonzo Martin lost Jeronne Maymon for the year due to a knee injury. But then Jordan McRae started making threes (24 of his last 42) and, well, here we are. The Vols are right on the knife-edge of in/out after losing by 10 at Georgia despite a typically heroic performance from McRae (35 points on 8-of-11 shooting on threes). Memo to McRae: To get the Elijah Johnson/Kendall Williams treatment, your team has to win.

Ole Miss is right there with Tennessee on that same knife-edge. Marshall Henderson is launching threes like he's present-tense Jordan McCrae (18 attempts against Mississippi State on Saturday), but making them like he's present-tense Marshall Henderson (three makes). The Rebels lost to the Bulldogs in Starkville this weekend, which most certainly qualifies as a bad loss. Andy Kennedy's team closes with a home game against Alabama and a road contest against LSU. Speaking of the Tide....

Alabama could still get in this thing. The Tide's game in Oxford tonight will be portrayed as an elimination game, and that may not be far off the mark.

The world's understanding of the non-Butler A-10 is unimpeachable

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Saint Louis      12-2   65.7    1.08    0.92    +0.16
2.  VCU              11-3   67.4    1.12    0.98    +0.14
3.  La Salle         10-4   66.5    1.08    0.97    +0.11
4.  UMass             8-6   69.9    1.07    1.02    +0.05
5.  Dayton            6-8   65.1    1.09    1.05    +0.04
6.  Butler            9-5   64.7    1.03    0.99    +0.04
7.  Temple            9-5   67.5    1.07    1.04    +0.03
8.  Xavier            8-6   63.9    1.02    0.99    +0.03
9.  Richmond          7-7   64.3    1.03    1.02    +0.01
10. GW                6-8   67.8    0.97    0.98    -0.01
11. St. Bonaventure   7-7   66.8    1.07    1.08    -0.01
12. Saint Joseph's    7-7   63.2    1.04    1.05    -0.01
13. Rhode Island     3-11   64.4    0.97    1.06    -0.09
14. Charlotte         6-8   69.2    0.96    1.06    -0.10
15. Duquesne         1-13   68.7    0.94    1.13    -0.19
16. Fordham          2-12   68.4    0.93    1.13    -0.20

AVG.                        66.5    1.03

Brad Stevens' Bulldogs are currently shown as a No. 6 seed in the mock brackets. So there.

Otherwise those same mock brackets mirror what you see here with surprising fidelity. Saint Louis and VCU are showing up around the 5- and 7-lines, respectively. Temple gets a nice boost thanks to that win in Madison Square Garden against Syracuse in December, so the Owls would appear to have one tentative foot in the field of 68, along with La Salle. UMass is on the bubble.

Obviously with a 16-team league that plays a 16-game schedule (I'm still unclear on how that happened), we shouldn't get too terribly hung up on the last 0.01 of a given efficiency margin. (Meaning, no, I'm not saying Dayton is really better than Butler.) Think instead in terms of tiers. SLU and the Rams are tier 1, the Explorers comprise a one-team tier 2, and every other team named here is clear tier 3 material.

C-USA: No land wars in Asia, no February road games at Xavier

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Memphis          14-0   69.6    1.11    0.92    +0.19
2.  Southern Miss    11-3   65.6    1.12    0.97    +0.15
3.  UTEP              9-5   61.5    1.02    0.96    +0.06
4.  UCF               8-6   67.5    1.04    1.04     0.00
5.  Tulane            6-8   65.3    1.05    1.06    -0.01
6.  UAB               7-7   67.1    1.00    1.01    -0.01
7.  East Carolina     7-7   69.7    1.04    1.05    -0.01
8.  SMU              4-10   63.6    1.00    1.01    -0.01
9.  Tulsa             7-7   67.1    0.99    1.01    -0.02
10. Houston           5-9   68.8    1.06    1.08    -0.02
11. Marshall          5-9   69.3    0.97    1.07    -0.10
12. Rice             1-13   61.8    0.95    1.17    -0.22

AVG.                        66.4    1.03

Losing to the Musketeers in Cincinnati one week ago tonight may have pushed Memphis into the exact same predicament they faced last year. The Tigers may have played themselves down to the 8-line, and that's big for a couple reasons. One, the opponent you face in an 8-9 game created by a group that still uses the RPI may be extremely good at basketball. (Ask Josh Pastner about Saint Louis sometime.) And, of course, even if you win that game, your reward is going to be a matchup with Indiana or Gonzaga or what have you.

In non-Memphis news, Southern Miss continues to lurk in the bubble discussion. Donnie Tyndall's team closes with a trip to Marshall and then a home game against UCF (the only non-Memphis team to beat the Golden Eagles in league play). Win those two, and a run to the C-USA title game (presumably against you-know-who) may be enough to get the job done.

Missouri Valley: When Nos. 3 and 4 meet, that is one robust quarterfinal

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Creighton        13-5   64.1    1.17    1.02    +0.15
2.  Wichita St.      12-6   63.5    1.07    0.97    +0.10
3.  N. Iowa          11-7   61.7    1.03    0.96    +0.07
4.  Illinois St.     8-10   68.1    1.05    1.01    +0.04
6.  Evansville       10-8   65.0    1.02    1.01    +0.01
5.  Indiana St.       9-9   65.5    1.01    1.01     0.00
7.  Drake            7-11   67.6    1.01    1.08    -0.07
8.  Missouri St.     7-11   60.0    1.01    1.11    -0.10
9.  Bradley          7-11   65.1    0.98    1.09    -0.11
10. S. Illinois      6-12   62.1    0.98    1.09    -0.11

AVG.                        64.3    1.03

The Valley season certainly had its odd twists and turns, but at the end Creighton has emerged as the best team just like everyone was predicting way back in October. Now the stage is set for what should be a very entertaining Arch Madness. (Bracket (pdf).)

For instance, don't you dare miss that quarterfinal Friday night between Illinois State and Northern Iowa. At various points during the season, both of those squads took a turn wearing the "hottest Valley team" label, so, yes, the nightcap on Friday sets up to be big. I would not be the least bit surprised to see the winner of that game playing the Bluejays on Sunday with the automatic bid on the line.

Mountain West: Peace at last

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  New Mexico       12-2   65.0    1.00    0.89    +0.11
2.  Colorado St.      9-5   64.7    1.10    1.01    +0.09
3.  San Diego St.     8-6   65.2    1.04    0.96    +0.08
4.  UNLV              9-5   67.1    0.99    0.94    +0.05
5.  Boise St.         8-6   64.2    1.06    1.04    +0.02
6.  Air Force         7-7   64.3    1.03    1.07    -0.03
7.  Fresno St.       4-11   60.8    0.94    1.02    -0.08
8.  Wyoming          4-11   59.5    0.89    0.99    -0.10
9.  Nevada           3-11   64.7    0.95    1.09    -0.14

AVG.                        64.4    1.00

Pretty much all season long New Mexico has sat atop the Mountain West standings, and all season long that has not been reflected in Tuesday Truths. Now, finally, those two measuring sticks have hammered out their differences and come to an agreement. I love when that happens.

As seen here, the Lobos have one of the best defenses in the country, one that, like Louisville, is adept at forcing turnovers yet also quite happy to make you miss your twos. That being said, this offense is not exactly poetry in motion in games where one of its players is not scoring 46 points. Barring a misstep or two in UNM's final two road games at Nevada and Air Force, Steve Alford's team is on track for a very high seed (currently projected on the 3-line). But, particularly in games where they don't get to the line, the Lobos are susceptible to dry spells.

West Coast: The importance of good timing

                      W-L   Pace    PPP   Opp. PPP    EM
1.  Gonzaga          16-0   63.7    1.21    0.91    +0.30
2.  Saint Mary's     14-2   64.5    1.14    0.94    +0.20
3.  BYU              10-6   69.0    1.10    1.00    +0.10
4.  Santa Clara       9-7   66.5    1.06    1.05    +0.01
5.  San Francisco     7-9   66.8    1.05    1.07    -0.02
6.  San Diego         7-9   63.6    0.99    1.07    -0.08
7.  Pepperdine       4-12   63.6    0.96    1.11    -0.15
8.  Portland         4-12   64.5    0.92    1.09    -0.17
9.  Loyola Marymount 1-15   64.9    0.91    1.09    -0.18

AVG.                        65.2    1.04

These are your final numbers for the 2013 WCC, and among the many tributes and accolades that Gonzaga has received this week, allow me to add one more. That "+0.30" you see next to the Zags is the highest end-of-season number ever recorded in the six years that Tuesday Truths has been running amok analytically. Even with due adjustment for the strength of the league, it was a remarkable run. Mark Few, I salute you!

I trust there will be time enough this month to discuss and dissect the Zags further. Today I want to pen a brief note on Saint Mary's. I've said this once before, but I think this could be the best team Randy Bennett has ever had in Moraga. Certainly on paper the Gaels rate as one of the best teams the WCC has produced in the last decade. And look at the year Bennett picked.

In any "normal" season this exact same SMC team is, at worst, 15-1, and ranked in the top 25, possibly the top 15. In any normal season Matthew Dellavedova's a shoo-in for West Coast POY, and is having gauzy features built around him by national writers. In any normal season the penalties slapped on the program by the NCAA due to recruiting violations are a much bigger story.

Part of the perceptual problem here is self-inflicted. While Gonzaga spent its November and December grinding Big 12 opponents into a fine powder, Saint Mary's chose not to play anyone. But SMC could have paid off that perception debt at least partially in a normal WCC season. This was not a normal WCC season.

John uses fewer decimal points on Twitter: @JohnGasaway.

John Gasaway is an author of Basketball Prospectus. You can contact John by clicking here or click here to see John's other articles.

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